Facets
foxadhd:

REBLOG IF YOU <3 UR BIG BUTT

foxadhd:

REBLOG IF YOU <3 UR BIG BUTT

cjwho:

The Illusion of Light, Palazzo Grassi, Venice by Doug Wheeler | via

Doug Wheeler’s lighting installation, titled D-N SF 12 PG VI, is installed for The Illusion of Light exhibition at Palazzo Grassi – an 18th century residence situated on Venice’s Grand Canal that now hosts contemporary art shows.

Visible on entering the gallery, the re-appropriated atrium space is flanked on two sides by the building’s original stone columns.

The other two edges, floor and roof are replaced with what appears to be just brilliant white light.

When viewed from the entrance hall, it is unclear how far the illuminated area extends up or back and visitors inside the space seem to be suspended in and surrounded by the light.

This disorientation and spatial uncertainty continue when entering the area as white lighting removes the sense of depth and perspective.

"Light becomes matter and redefines space and time by eliminating the perceptual markers of the visitor, who is left between a mirage and reality, nature and artifice, fullness and emptiness, moment and duration," said a statement from the gallery.

Venturing far enough into the space, it is possible to get into a position facing away from the columns so the light completely fills the field of view.

The effect is created inside a reinforced fibreglass shell, which is coated in titanium dioxide paint and illuminated with LEDs.

The shell curves up gently from the floor to create two walls and a ceiling. Lighting is used to remove the shadows that would usually give away where the surfaces change direction.

The Illusion of Light exhibition was curated by Caroline Bourgeois and continues until 31 December.

Photography: Fulvio Orsenigo

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bookpickings:

On the Shortness of Life

Seneca


“The greatest obstacle to living is expectancy, which hangs upon tomorrow and loses today… The whole future lies in uncertainty: live immediately.”


Seneca on busyness and the art of living wide rather than living long – the kind of read that stays with you for a lifetime:

bookpickings:

On the Shortness of Life

Seneca

“The greatest obstacle to living is expectancy, which hangs upon tomorrow and loses today… The whole future lies in uncertainty: live immediately.”

Seneca on busyness and the art of living wide rather than living long – the kind of read that stays with you for a lifetime:

Experience is what you get when you didn’t get what you wanted. And experience is often the most valuable thing you have to offer.
It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly. So that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.
Theodore Roosevelt (via glmdrng)
experimentsinmotion:

Rolling Coal: From Anti-Environmentalists in the U.S. to the ISIS in the Middle East
If you missed the media frenzy earlier this summer, “rolling coal" is the term for a rising trend among anti-environmentalist conservatives in the U.S. who alter their truck engines to emit massive black clouds of exhaust, often from smoke stack-like attachments. Owners of coal rolling trucks, who often hail from regions historically associating with coal production, see the trend as a very direct statement against sustainability—and its stereotypically liberal ties. A seller of smoke stack kits for trucks describes rolling coal as a “a way of giving them [liberals] the finger. You want clean air and a tiny carbon footprint? Well, screw you.” Now, in a bizarre cultural crossover, Vice News has captured members of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), a hardline Sunni jihadist group that formerly had ties to al Qaeda, “rolling coal” in a military tank. The group, intending to place Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi as the leader of a restored caliphate, began making shockingly rapid advances across Iraq and Syria in June. Armed with cash and US weapons seized during its advances in Iraq, and exploiting control over critical water and energy supplies, the ISIS continues to exercise a stranglehold over the region. 

experimentsinmotion:

Rolling Coal: From Anti-Environmentalists in the U.S. to the ISIS in the Middle East

If you missed the media frenzy earlier this summer, “rolling coal" is the term for a rising trend among anti-environmentalist conservatives in the U.S. who alter their truck engines to emit massive black clouds of exhaust, often from smoke stack-like attachments. Owners of coal rolling trucks, who often hail from regions historically associating with coal production, see the trend as a very direct statement against sustainability—and its stereotypically liberal ties. A seller of smoke stack kits for trucks describes rolling coal as a “a way of giving them [liberals] the finger. You want clean air and a tiny carbon footprint? Well, screw you.” Now, in a bizarre cultural crossover, Vice News has captured members of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), a hardline Sunni jihadist group that formerly had ties to al Qaeda, “rolling coal” in a military tank. The group, intending to place Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi as the leader of a restored caliphate, began making shockingly rapid advances across Iraq and Syria in June. Armed with cash and US weapons seized during its advances in Iraq, and exploiting control over critical water and energy supplies, the ISIS continues to exercise a stranglehold over the region. 

subtilitas:

Christian Pottgiesser - Maison L, Yvelines 2011. Via, photos (C) George Dupin.

subtilitas:

Vo Trong Nghia Architects - House for trees, Ho Chi Minh City 2014. Photos (C) Hiroyuki Oki.